Do not show up late to a meeting with a coffee.

As a general rule: Do not show up late to a meeting with a coffee.

I did this today, but you never should. The message is clear.

 

Microwave Time Remainder Temporal Disorientation, a definition

Microwave Time Remainder Temporal Disorientation – definition: The disorientation experienced when the remaining cook time on a microwave display appears to be a feasible but inaccurate time of day.

Example:

1:15 PM: Suzie puts her leftover pork chops in the office microwave, enters 5:00, and hits Start. After 1 minutes and 17 seconds, she hears sizzling, opens the microwave door and takes her meal.

1:25 PM: John walks by the microwave, sees 3:43 on the display and thinks: “What!? My life is slipping away from me!”

 

Why an open Web is important when sea levels are rising

Cory Doctorow speaking on episode 221 of the excellent Changelog podcast:

“[t]here are things that are way more important than [whether in the internet should or shouldn’t be free]. There’s fundamental issues of economic justice, there’s climate change, there’s questions of race and gender and gender orientation, that are a lot more urgent than the future of the internet, but […] every one of those fights is going to be won or lost on the internet.”

 

Watch this person use Excel for an hour

Joel Spolsky, of Stack Overflow, Trello, and Fog Creek, did an internal presentation where he just walked through how he uses Microsoft Excel for about an hour.

It’s riveting for two reasons.

First, I learned a bunch of techniques that I didn’t know existed (transpose! named values! oh my!). Unfortunately, many of those don’t apply to Google Spreadsheets, which is worth using due to the simple and powerful collaboration tools. A few of the techniques are universal to spreadsheets, though.

Second, he’s good at it. There is something compelling about watching someone with deep skill and knowledge do their work, regardless of what it is. In the same way, I can enjoy watching a skilled musical perform regardless of my interest and taste in their musical genre.

This style of presentation, featuring a simple tour of the just-beyond-basic features, is a great way to share with co-workers. I’ve learned a ton from watching Stephen use Photoshop, and I got hooked on split-panes in iTerm after watching Malena screen-share in an unrelated presentation.

 

Design sprints and healthcare

With the help of a few of my co-workers, I’ve written about a new design sprint process we’ve been using at silverorange, and how it applies in healthcare organizations. It started as a post on our silverorange blog, but was pulled into GV‘s Sprint Stories publication (thanks to John Zeratsky).

If you love design processes and healthcare (and who doesn’t), read the article: Running a design sprint in a healthcare organization

 

On Surplus

“We as human beings find a way to waste most surpluses that technology hands to us.”

—Stewart Butterfield of Slack speaking on The Ezra Klein Show podcast.

He also makes a good analogy between our difficulty managing the new ability to communicate with anyone/anytime and the difficulty of dealing with the abundance of easy/cheap calories available to many of us.

 

I hate deals

One of my favourite tech-writers, Paul Miller from The Verge, has articulated something I’ve always felt, but have never been able to express well: I hate deals.

From Why I’m a Prime Day Grinch: I hate deals by Paul Miller:

Deals aren’t about you. They’re about improving profits for the store, and the businesses who distribute products through that store. Amazon’s Prime Day isn’t about giving back to the community. It’s about unloading stale inventory and making a killing.

But what about when you decide you really do want / need something, and it just happens to be on sale? Well, lucky you. I guess I’ve grown too bitter and skeptical. I just assume automatically that if something’s on sale AND I want to buy it, I must’ve messed up in my decision making process somewhere along the way.

I also hate parties and fun.

 

silverorange job opening: Back-end Web Developer

Silverorange, the web design and development company where I work, is looking to hire another great back-end web developer. It’s a nice place to work.

 

Recommended Reading: Trajectory Book 1 and 2 by Robert Campbell

Years ago I had the pleasure of meeting Deb Richardson and Rob Campbell, a couple who were both working at Mozilla at the time. They came to our Zap Your PRAM conference in Dalvay back in 2008.

Rob was working on the Firefox dev tools, which had begun to lag behind Chrome, and have since become great again.

Trajectory by Rob Campbell

Then last year, I saw that Rob was self-publishing a science-fiction novel. This interested me as several of the books I’ve enjoyed recently are in the genre (Seveneves by Neal Stephenson, Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora, and my all-time favourite, the Mars trilogy). However, I was concerned. What if someone you know invites you to their comedy night and just isn’t funny? Fortunately, this wasn’t the case with Rob.

Rob’s book, Trajectory Book 1 was great. Easy to read, interesting, and nerdy in the right ways. My only complaint was that it ended abruptly. The solution to this, obviously, is Book 2, which came out yesterday.

If you have any interest in science fiction, I can gladly recommend Rob Campbell’s Trajectory Book 1 (and I’m looking forward to starting Trajectory Book 2).

 

You know what they say: Big hands, small horse.