New Mozilla.org Design is Live!

It’s up! The new design for Mozilla.org by Daniel Burka, myself, and the others here at silverorange, working with the brilliant and patient people at the Mozilla Foundation has just gone live.

Here’s the CVS checkin:

dbaron%dbaron.org – 2004-08-31 14:31
Landing BETA_20040721_BRANCH: new template, homepage, and product page design by Steven Garrity and Daniel Burka from silverorange, and required tools changes by Myk Melez.

Be sure to refresh! Thanks to all involved (especially bart, dbaron, and myk).

Of course, there is still lots to do to improve the site, and we’ll keep working on it – but for now, it feels good to be live.

 

19 thoughts on “New Mozilla.org Design is Live!

  1. Excellent work, Steven & co. Thank you for giving us a nice, clean website.

    By the way, the “New Website Launches” announcement is a direct link to Silver Orange’s website; unless I’m missing something here, shouldn’t it link to an announcement about the redesign first (and from there, to silverorange.com)?

    Anyway, kudos for the great work again.

  2. Excellent work! Such a good cross-platform design – I’ll put aside my grumblings about the visibility of Camino for now. It just looks great!

  3. Sweet! Congratulations to Steve and the others at silverorange.

    The site looks much clearer and easier to use. It also has a fresh, breezy feel to it with the blue shades.

    Excellent job!

  4. I just noticed a bug:

    The Firefox and Thunderbird promo button pages have big, ugly borders surrounding the images. The effect’s not that great, but it’s particularly bad because the provided HTML code uses border=”0″, so it’s immediately obvious we aren’t even using the code we suggest others use. (still trivial, but not pretty)

    http://www.mozilla.org/products/firefox/buttons.html
    http://www.mozilla.org/products/thunderbird/buttons.html

    Incidentally, is there any reason you haven’t disabled borders on all images inside links? I couldn’t find any images in links with borders at a quick glance at mozilla.org.

  5. This is great! It looks really neat. ‘Renders impeccably on Firefox (‘had better!) and IE6.

    Unfortunately, it suffers from some glitches on Konqueror, even on the latest 3.3. If you’d like to, we’d be glad to help you in trying to fix those. If interested, let me know through e-mail.

  6. Brett – well once you know where it is, should be easy enough to find. The path it should be findable from is developers -> projects -> firefox, but it doesn’t seem to be listed on the projects page. You can get to it by going to the main roadmap in the developers section, and it’s linked from the body of the text. Or you can search for “Firefox roadmap”, or it’s frequently linked from the builds forums. But it is supposed to be a document for people involved in the project, rather than something for users/media/general public.

  7. First of all, I think the new design looks great!

    What mozilla.org needs now, is a thorough walkthrough of its information architecture. Brett Donalds complaint illustrate this point. The Firefox-project page isn’t navigable from the projects page. To get to mozilla.org/projects/ i first have to go to mozilla.org/developer. Do i have to be a developer of mozilla related code to be interesting in upcoming features and proposed release dates for coming versions of Firefox (e.g. the roadmap)? I tend to disagree…

    Mozilla.org also needs to communicate its information architecture in a better way by adding a navigable breadcrumb-trail. Today your mostly stuck with searching and then hacking urls to be able to navigate the site succesfully. For instance the Firefox roadmap gives the user no visual navigating option to go the Firefox projects. You have to hack the URL to go to the project-homepage. There should be a navigable breadcrumb trail equal to the URL to let users navigate to levels above their current level in the information architecture. The breadcrumb-trail for the Firefox Roadmap should be: “Home -> Projects -> Firefox -> Roadmap”. Why? Because most users don’t hack URLs, heck they don’t even now what an URL is.

  8. well done, but the “Free download” link for Firefox is not a good idea, because commercial sites that sells shareware do the same : it means that the download is free, but not the software… :-/

    a link like “Free software” could be better…

  9. The site looks great. The only thing I don’t think looks so good is the firefox screenshot on the homepage. I realize it will show a different screenshot on each refresh, but I don’t think that it should identifiably show one commercial webpage, as it seems like endorsement (like the Onion screenshot). I don’t think the average visitor is going to refresh once they are at the homepage, and may be turned off by a screenshot of a page that they don’t like.

    Maybe this would be better served with an animation that blends through the images (using flash?)…

  10. Where is Firefox on the page http://www.mozilla.org/projects/? Isn’t it Mozilla.org’s MOST IMPORTANT project? It should be on the top of the list, but search the page text for “firefox” and there’s not even ONE reference to it.

    This is a navigation issue, which is why I’m mentioning it here. I should be able to navigate to /projects/firefox without hacking the URL.

  11. You guys have designed a web site that I would feel proud of hosting my content on. Very good work! It’s finally time to merge Firefox/Thunderbird Help with Mozilla.org.

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